ICD-10

141,000!!

What is that 141,000 number mean? That is just the total number of ever more specific diagnosis codes that comes along with the Tenth Edition of the International Classification of Disease (ICD-10). A little bit of an increase from the Ninth Edition (ICD-9) which totaled 17,000 codes. The department of Health and Human Services (HHS) extended the compliance date from what would have been October 1 of this year, to October 1, 2014. Although the date has been pushed back once again, HHS urges all covered entities under the Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to continue, or start, preparations for the transition to ICD-10.

A transition of this magnitude requires extensive planning and preparation in all aspects of a medical practice and throughout the industry. It is recommended that timelines be established as soon as possible to help manage tasks and keep the transition from becoming too overwhelming.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have created an example timeline to help illustrate the process. Click the link below to view the timeline.

http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD10/Downloads/ICD10SmallMediumTimelineChart.pdf

What does this mean for a physician?

Most changes will be on coding and coding staff becoming familiar with the new format of codes and the multiple options for a specific diagnosis. It will also take some coordination from physicians in being more specific with their diagnosis when charting. In ICD-9 there would typically be one option for a particular condition, where as in ICD-10 there may be multiple. Below is an example of of the differences of what is reported using ICD-9 and what will be required with ICD-10.

Example: 1                                      

ICD-9

784.0 – Headache

ICD-10

G441 – Vascular Headache Not elsewhere classified

R51 – Headache

Example: 2

ICD-9

784.59 – Speech Disturbances

ICD-10

R4702 – Dysphasia

R4781 – Slurred Speech

R4789 – Other Speech Disturbances

Note: ICD-10 will not affect CPT codes.

Although diligent efforts are being made industry wide for a smooth efficient transition, a change of this scale is not without it’s bumps and hiccups, foreseen and unseen alike. Payment, and claims processing delays are a major concern. With the 5010 transition last year which was the electronic claim file format upgrade from 4010, payment and claims processing delays did cause cash flow problems nationally. Cash flow is a major concern to any organization, group, private practice or covered entity under HIPAA. To help organizations prepare as best they can and avoid cash flow issues, it is being recommended that organizations begin preparations now! Some consultants have also suggested providers and organizations build a line of credit that can sustain them anywhere from two to six months after the compliance date to manage delays in payments.

Training of coding and other staff is also a vital component for preparations for the ICD-10 transition. Studies showed that after the ICD-10 transition in Canada, staff productivity dropped by 50 percent in the first six months. A drop in productivity means that fewer patient claims will be submitted timely and more money paid to staff for increased time thus affecting cash flow and the bottom line. It is imperative that physicians and organizations help staff to understand the importance of preparing for the transition to avoid productivity drops.

Contacting vendors is also another key cog in the wheel of preparation. Contact and follow up with, EHR/EMR vendors, billing software vendors, outsourced billing providers, electronic clearinghouses, and payers. Software testing with clearinghouses and payers will typically be handled through the software vendors, or outsourced service providers but none the less, providers and organizations should follow up to ensure preparation and timelines have been established.

Some helpful hints to plan for the ICD-10 transition:

  • Start a plan
  • Establish a timeline
  • Contact vendors
  • Staff Training
  • Build a line of credit

If you’re asking yourself, “when do i start planing for ICD-10?”. THE TIME IS NOW!